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Tag Archives: freedom of the press

The Right to Offend <- Orwell


If liberty means anything at all it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.

The common people still vaguely subscribe to that doctrine and act on it. In our country — it is not the same in all countries: it was not so in republican France, and it is not so in the USA today — it is the liberals who fear liberty and the intellectuals who want to do dirt on the intellect

— George Orwell, Freedom of the Press (1948)

(This was to be the foreword of Animal Farm. It is perfect irony, that the publisher decided to censor it.)
 
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Posted by on January 10, 2011 in Philosophy, Politics, society

 

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Liberty to Know and Argue by Conscience


Areopagitica is regarded as one of the most eloquent defences of press freedom ever written.

Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties.

- John Milton, Areopagitica: A speech of Mr. John Milton for the liberty of unlicensed printing to the Parliament of England, 1644

 
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Posted by on July 12, 2010 in Politics

 

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The People, Each and Every One


In recent years it has been suggested that the Second Amendment protects the “collective” right of states to maintain militias, while it does not protect the right of “the people” to keep and bear arms…The phrase “the people” meant the same thing in the Second Amendment as it did in the First, Fourth, Ninth and Tenth Amendments — that is, each and every free person.

A select militia defined as only the privileged class entitled to keep and bear arms was considered an anathema to a free society, in the same way that Americans denounced select spokesmen approved by the government as the only class entitled to the freedom of the press.

If anyone entertained this notion in the period during which the Constitution and Bill of Rights were debated and ratified, it remains one of the most closely guarded secrets of the 18th century, for no known writing surviving from the period between 1787 and 1791 states such a thesis.

- Stephen P. Holbrook, That Every Man Be Armed: The Evolution of a Constitutional Right

Because the first two amendments of the Bill of Rights were not ratified, the right to keep and bear arms was actually number four in the original document

Because the first two amendments of the Bill of Rights were not ratified, the right to keep and bear arms was actually number four in the original document

 
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Posted by on September 1, 2009 in Politics

 

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